Potential Budget Cuts Cause Concern for CDS Participants

Help us spread the word about the impact of these potential budget cuts for Missourians with disabilities.

MERIL Participants Worry about Potential State Budget Cuts – KQ2

April 20, 2017: KQ2 Report: MERIL Participants Worry About Potential State Budget Cuts.Anchor 1: […] across the state have their eyes on Jefferson City, waiting to see the results of state budget negotiations.Anchor 2: Over at MERIL, there are some worry among some developmentally disabled clients that their funding – that currently keeps them living in their own home – may be cut. They share how potential budget changes could shake up their day-to-day life.Wendy: The cut would be really bad for me.Reporter: There’s a lot of concern at MERIL, as participants anxiously await the fate of a program that has become a part of their lives.Rob: We are here to educate and advocate for the Consumer Directed Services program. This is a program that helps people with disabilities stay in their own home with attendant care.Reporter: MERIL held a lunch for program participants to answer questions while they keep a close eye on the state capitol.Rob: It’s funded through Medicaid services, and down in Jefferson City, it is in peril in terms of budget cuts.Reporter: Participants have different reasons they’re in the program.Wendy: Unfortunately, the doctor that done it clipped a nerve, which started causing my legs to go numb and weak. And, I’m still struggling to try to walk again.Deborah: It shattered everything in my wrist.Reporter: But are thankful for their caregivers helping them stay at home.Wendy: I’ve got to have somebody to help me do my laundry, to do dishes, even to bathe, to get dressed.Deborah: I can’t get in and out of the shower. I can’t get in and out of my house. I can’t cook meals by myself.Reporter: They say cuts could mean they’ll have no choice but to move.Wendy: I honestly don’t want to go live in no nursing home.Reporter: They hope lawmakers will think of the people impacted by the program when deciding the budget.Wendy: If our governors and our senators – even our president – could think: “You know, what if my mother, or what if my daughter, or my wife, or my husband was to get injured?” They’re going to need in-home health. They’re going to need somebody. You know, “Who am I going to get to do that?”Anchor 2: MERIL says it currently has over 300 participants in the Consumer Directed Services program in Northwest Missouri.

Posted by MERIL on Wednesday, April 26, 2017

 

Meril Participants Worry About Potential State Budget Cuts

Thursday, April 20th 2017, 6:44 pm CDT by Amber Smith

ST. JOSEPH, Mo.

A lot of agencies have their eyes on Jefferson City, awaiting the new budget to learn the fate of their programs.

Meril in St. Joseph hosted a lunch Thursday for Consumer Directed Services participants to answer questions about the impact potential budget cuts would have on the program.

“This program helps people with disabilities stay in their own home with attendant care,” Meril CEO Rob Honan said. “It is funded through Medicaid services and it is in peril in terms of budget cuts.”

Participant Wendy Story said she is in the program because a back surgery went wrong, causing a nerve problem.

She said there is a lot she would not be able to do without her caregiver.

“I have to have someone help me do laundry, my dishes, bathe and get dressed,” Story said.

For Deborah Kindberg, it was a fall resulting in her shattering her wrist that led her to Meril.

“I can’t get in and out of the shower. I can’t get into my house,” Kindberg said. “I can’t cook for myself.”

They said the help of their caregivers allows them to keep living in the comfort of their own home. However, with cuts, they might need to move into a nursing home.

“I don’t want to move into a nursing home,” Story said. “Being in my own home with my family is more healing power than you could get in any facility or hospital.”

Meril said there are currently 300 program participants in Northwest Missouri that could be impacted by the cut.

Meril encouraged those participants to reach out to local lawmakers to hopefully impact the budget decisions.

The original news story is available here: http://www.stjoechannel.com/story/35204434/meril-participants-worry-about-potential-state-budget-cuts.

 

Pam discusses CDS budget cuts on KQ2's Live at Five

Transcript:April 11, 2017: Pam Schneeflock discusses CDS budget cuts on KQ2’s Live at Five.Interviewer: Welcome back. Our next guest tonight is Pam Schneeflock from Midland Empire Resources for Independent Living. We’re talking about how some big decisions in Jeff City could impact people here with disabilities. Welcome tonight, Pam. Certainly a big and relevant topic right now.Pam: It is. There are a lot of difficult proposed budget cuts that the legislators are having to deal with, so a big “shout out” to our senators and representatives for making some tough decisions. A lot of times when budget cuts get proposed, they may seem to hit our most vulnerable citizens, and some of the cuts proposed would target people who are aging and people with disabilities through the Consumer Directed Services program.That program allows people with disabilities to bring a little bit of help into their home every day with a staff person coming in to assist them if they need help with getting up and down out of bed, if they need help getting in and out of a bathtub, cooking a meal, doing some house cleaning.So, one of the really difficult cuts that’s being proposed is a 60% cap on what that program could pay, a 60% cap of what a nursing home could pay per month, as opposed to cutting services to people staying in their own homes by 60%. So, that would make their day look pretty different than it does now.Interviewer: So, these are kind of just proposals as of right now, but of course, we know that there’s always a chance that they could go into effect. So, what do you recommend people start to be aware of now?Pam: Well, the proposals came out of the House and now it’s on the Senate side. And then even after they’re done deliberating, the governor has the choice to do what he wants to do. We would just encourage people to – if you have a mom, or dad, or a grandma who is on the Consumer Directed Services program, and getting some help in their home, I would suggest talking to your legislators. They really are interested in what you have to say, in how this could impact someone in their home by cutting their services almost in half, to where they might have to choose – they might become housebound because of this – they might have to make the choice to go into a more restrictive environment, such as a nursing home, which would end up costing the state more.Interviewer: Alright, if you would like any more information about this, it is up on your screen right now. You can reach out to Pam at the number on your screen: 816-279-8558. Thank you so much for being here tonight and talking about this with us, and sharing it with our viewers.Pam: Thanks.

Posted by MERIL on Wednesday, April 26, 2017

 

April 11, 2017: Pam Schneeflock discusses CDS budget cuts on KQ2’s Live at Five.

Interviewer: Welcome back. Our next guest tonight is Pam Schneeflock from Midland Empire Resources for Independent Living. We’re talking about how some big decisions in Jeff City could impact people here with disabilities. Welcome tonight, Pam. Certainly a big and relevant topic right now.

Pam: It is. There are a lot of difficult proposed budget cuts that the legislators are having to deal with, so a big “shout out” to our senators and representatives for making some tough decisions. A lot of times when budget cuts get proposed, they may seem to hit our most vulnerable citizens, and some of the cuts proposed would target people who are aging and people with disabilities through the Consumer Directed Services program.

That program allows people with disabilities to bring a little bit of help into their home every day with a staff person coming in to assist them if they need help with getting up and down out of bed, if they need help getting in and out of a bathtub, cooking a meal, doing some house cleaning.

So, one of the really difficult cuts that’s being proposed is a 60% cap on what that program could pay, a 60% cap of what a nursing home could pay per month, as opposed to cutting services to people staying in their own homes by 60%. So, that would make their day look pretty different than it does now.

Interviewer: So, these are kind of just proposals as of right now, but of course, we know that there’s always a chance that they could go into effect. So, what do you recommend people start to be aware of now?

Pam: Well, the proposals came out of the House and now it’s on the Senate side. And then even after they’re done deliberating, the governor has the choice to do what he wants to do. We would just encourage people to – if you have a mom, or dad, or a grandma who is on the Consumer Directed Services program, and getting some help in their home, I would suggest talking to your legislators. They really are interested in what you have to say, in how this could impact someone in their home by cutting their services almost in half, to where they might have to choose – they might become housebound because of this – they might have to make the choice to go into a more restrictive environment, such as a nursing home, which would end up costing the state more.

Interviewer: Alright, if you would like any more information about this, it is up on your screen right now. You can reach out to Pam at the number on your screen: 816-279-8558. Thank you so much for being here tonight and talking about this with us, and sharing it with our viewers.

Pam: Thanks.

 

Proposed state budget could directly impact disabled people in St. Joe

Midland Empire Resources for Independent Living, or MERIL, is facing potentially dramatic funding cuts in the current budget proposals in Jefferson City, not to mention the massive cuts being proposed at the federal level. MERIL held a gathering Thursday to get the word out.

CEO Rob Honan tells us some disabled people they serve could lose those services altogether.

Others could see them reduced, which would force them the make some difficult choices. “You may have to have a choice of getting out of bed, getting back into bed, taking a bath only once or twice a week,” Honan said. “So, these are very real considerations. Not only that, they impact the health of an individual.”

We met such an individual, Jaime Shelby, who suffers from cerebral policy and was injured in a serious traffic accident. Independent Living Specialist Jay Claywell says Jaime’s muscles are contracting because she spends so much time in a wheelchair. Clawell says if Jaime cuts back on bathing, she faces the possibility of other, more serious health problems, like infection and skin breakdown.

“If she’s not able to keep herself personally,hygienically, as clean as she wants to, then she’s dealing with potentially more daunting medical conditions, which she shouldn’t have to,” Claywell said.

Honan said a lot of MERIL’s participants might have to be institutionalized, rather than cared for in their homes, if the funding cuts being proposed are finally approved. He says that could ultimately prove more expensive.

“Keeping them at home, keeping their mental health in check, keeping their physical health in check is very important for us,” He said. “If they go without services their mental health is affected, as well as their physical health.”

“In the long run that could be more costly to the state.”

Claywell said losing MERIL services would dramatically raise the personal costs for participants like Jaime Shelby. “They allow her to remain in her home, as opposed to being hospitalized, as opposed to being institutionalized, or put into a rehab facility, and if you take that away from her, you basically destroy her existence as she knows it now,” he said.

“We have to be forward thinking,” he said. “And we have to see what the impact would be.”

“That’s why I asked my friend Jaime to be here so that visually she can make an impact, and with her story she can make an impact, and you can see, if you’re paying attention, whose lives you’re impacting.”

Honan acknowledges that state lawmakers are faced with some critical budget realities. “Every year we have to fight,” Honan said. “Unfortunately, the legislators go after folks that sometimes can’t get to Jefferson City and argue their position. So we try to work with the folks down there to represent them, and also take people down there as much as we can,” he said.

Honan is hoping people will contact their local legislators, who he said are for the most part sympathetic, and are looking at ways to try to fund the program. The budget is always tight here in Missouri every year, he said, and this year there is additional uncertainty with the potential loss of federal block grants.

“It’s been a very challenging year,” Honan said.

The current House and Senate budget proposals are scheduled to go to conference committee next week.

This story was originally published here: http://www.stjosephpost.com/2017/04/20/proposed-state-budget-could-directly-impact-meril-and-its-participants/.

 

Jay discusses CDS (and Chris interprets)

Transcript:December 13, 2016: Jay Claywell discusses CDS (and Chris Kaster interprets) on KQ2’s Live at Five.Interviewer: If you’re struggling with health issues or disabilities, it can be tough to keep up with your everyday chores. Jay is here tonight from MERIL to talk about a program designed to help with those tasks. Thank you for being here today, Jay. Jay: Sure.Interviewer: So, can you kind of explain how people can get a little bit of assistance with those day-to-day chores that might be hard to keep up with?Jay: Well, the program that we’re – that you’re talking about is our Consumer Directed Services program. It’s essentially designed to assist with keeping a person with a disability, or someone that’s aging, in their home. What it is is a Medicaid-funded program that allows the agency, MERIL, to serve as a fiscal intermediary, and use this person’s Medicaid dollars to pay an attendant – a personal care service provider – a wage so that this person – this attendant – can provide assistance to a person that’s aging or a person that has a disability so that they might stay in their home.We do things like allow for housekeeping – like I said – personal care services, grooming, some transportation – things like that.Interviewer: Why is it so important for people to be able to have an option to where they can stay in the comfort of their own home?Jay: Well, it gives – basically, it gives you a larger world to work inside of, instead of being in a nursing home or an institution, if you will. You’re allowed to live in the community and stay in the community, and live life at your own pace, under your own guidance, and by your own terms.Interviewer: And if people are interested in this program, how can they go about kind of getting everything set up. What are those beginning processes like?Jay: Well, what would happen is they would call us at 279-8558 and speak with one of our intake coordinators, and then we would assist them in learning what the next step would be.Interviewer: Okay, so do you guys gauge their needs, then?Jay: Well, we don’t do the assessments. Those are done by the Department of Health and Senior Services, but we sort of facilitate information-sharing and all of that, so that we can get them started down the path towards maintaining their independence, of their own accord.Interviewer: Alright, and just a quick reminder for people wanting to reach out. How can they find you guys?Jay: Again, we’re at MERIL.org, and we’re also at 816-279-8558.Interviewer: Alright, thank you so much, Jay.Jay: You’re welcome.

Posted by MERIL on Wednesday, April 26, 2017

 

December 13, 2016: Jay Claywell discusses CDS (and Chris Kaster interprets) on KQ2’s Live at Five.

Interviewer: If you’re struggling with health issues or disabilities, it can be tough to keep up with your everyday chores. Jay is here tonight from MERIL to talk about a program designed to help with those tasks. Thank you for being here today, Jay.

Jay: Sure.

Interviewer: So, can you kind of explain how people can get a little bit of assistance with those day-to-day chores that might be hard to keep up with?

Jay: Well, the program that we’re – that you’re talking about is our Consumer Directed Services program. It’s essentially designed to assist with keeping a person with a disability, or someone that’s aging, in their home. What it is is a Medicaid-funded program that allows the agency, MERIL, to serve as a fiscal intermediary, and use this person’s Medicaid dollars to pay an attendant – a personal care service provider – a wage so that this person – this attendant – can provide assistance to a person that’s aging or a person that has a disability so that they might stay in their home.

We do things like allow for housekeeping – like I said – personal care services, grooming, some transportation – things like that.

Interviewer: Why is it so important for people to be able to have an option to where they can stay in the comfort of their own home?

Jay: Well, it gives – basically, it gives you a larger world to work inside of, instead of being in a nursing home or an institution, if you will. You’re allowed to live in the community and stay in the community, and live life at your own pace, under your own guidance, and by your own terms.

Interviewer: And if people are interested in this program, how can they go about kind of getting everything set up. What are those beginning processes like?

Jay: Well, what would happen is they would call us at 279-8558 and speak with one of our intake coordinators, and then we would assist them in learning what the next step would be.

Interviewer: Okay, so do you guys gauge their needs, then?

Jay: Well, we don’t do the assessments. Those are done by the Department of Health and Senior Services, but we sort of facilitate information-sharing and all of that, so that we can get them started down the path towards maintaining their independence, of their own accord.

Interviewer: Alright, and just a quick reminder for people wanting to reach out. How can they find you guys?

Jay: Again, we’re at MERIL.org, and we’re also at 816-279-8558.

Interviewer: Alright, thank you so much, Jay.

Jay: You’re welcome.

MO ABLE Savings Plans for Missourians with Disabilities

Learn more about MO ABLE here: https://www.moable.com/

Program helps with disability expenses

By Alonzo Weston News-Press Now, May 1, 2017.

MO ABLE will allow people with disabilities and their families to save and invest through tax-free savings accounts to pay for related expenses. The savings won’t count towards a person’s total assets when determining their Medicaid eligibity.

Ron Honan, executive director for MERIL (Midland Empire Resources for Independent Living), said the program will be a great benefit for his clients and others with disabilities.

“The MO ABLE Act basically are tax savings accounts that allow individuals with disabilities to have greater purchasing power for the things they may need, such as durable medical equipment, maybe housing, some of the things they need to live more independently,” he said.

Families can give tax-deductible donations of as much as $8,000 to the program. Married couples can give as much as $16,000.

MERIL serves more than 900 people with disabilities through a number of services, including its independent living program, consumer direct services program, in-home program and an interpreter program.

The (MO ABLE program) is a fabulous resource for people with disabilities to live more independently and get those things they need in order ot survive in today’s society,” Honan said.

For more information, call the Missouri Treasury Department at 573-751-2411.

This news story is available here: http://www.newspressnow.com/news/local_news/program-helps-with-disability-expenses/article_7d84f140-3fff-5366-bac1-264885e1a930.html.

Learn more about MO ABLE here: https://www.moable.com/

MERIL Receives Website Accessibility Award

If you want to make your website more accessible to people with disabilities, you may want to use MERIL’s site as an example.

The Missouri Governor’s Council on Disability awarded its first annual website/IT award to MERIL for having a website that strives to be accessible to all people. MERIL is a not-for-profit organization that provides resources to people with disabilities and those who are aging in Northwest Missouri. CEO Rob Honan accepted the award at the annual Power Up assistive technology conference in Columbia, MO.

“It’s an honor to be the first organization to receive this award,” Honan said. “One of the purposes of MERIL is to make our community more accessible to people with all types of disabilities, and it’s important for us and our information to be as accessible as possible.”

According to the award announcement from the Governor’s Council on Disability, “MERIL’s website is designed to be accessible to all, including people with visual impairments who are using a screen reader or other forms of assistive technology. It allows changes in font size, high contrast, and translation capabilities. Closed caption of videos and audio content make the website accessible to people who are deaf or hearing impaired.”

MERIL offers a variety of services for people with disabilities and those who are aging, including assistance with personal care attendants, in-home nursing, assistive technology, sign-language interpreting, youth transition, information and referral services, and community education and advocacy.

More information about MERIL and its resources is available at www.meril.org and at 816-279-8558.

Read the website award announcement here: http://disability.mo.gov/gcd/websiteaward.htm.

Welcome Rob Honan, our new CEO!

New MERIL director hopes to prove organization’s importance

After having three interim directors over the past several months, MERIL (the Midland Empire Resource for Independent Living) finally has a new executive director.

Rob Honan, who previously served as executive director of the Missouri Governor’s Council on Disability, replaces J.C. Dollar, MERIL’s former executive director.

Honan, who also is a Kansas City, Missouri, native, said he was excited to take over the position.

“This is a great organization. MERIL, the centers for independent living, do a wonderful thing for a lot of people with disabilities but also the community benefits as well because when you have people with disabilities living in their own homes, the community is better off,” he said.

Honan, who also has a hearing disability, said he hopes to get the state and federal legislators to understand the importance of centers like MERIL. The agency serves more than 5,000 people a year through a variety of disability services.

“Right now, we’ve got a very interesting political climate going on in Jefferson City, as well as in Washington, D.C., so there is a lot of education there with our legislators both on the federal and state level to make sure they understand the need of people with disabilities,” Honan said.

Deann Young, MERIL’s chief human resource officer, said one of the great things about working with MERIL is that we are a small family and they feel blessed that Honan has joined the staff.

“He has a great deal of experience with the governor’s council on disabilities. He himself has a disability so he understands that part of it. He also helps people advocate for themselves,” she said.

 

http://www.newspressnow.com/news/local_news/new-meril-director-hopes-to-prove-organization-s-importance/article_2b4edc20-fa2b-5d29-9238-b461f7433418.html

 

Former Director of Governor’s Council on Disability is new CEO at MERIL

March 10, 2017 – Press Release from MERIL

St. Joseph, MO – Rob Honan is the new chief executive officer at Midland Empire Resources for Independent Living (MERIL), a not-for-profit organization that provides resources to people with disabilities and those who are aging in Northwest Missouri.

Honan twice served as the executive director for the Missouri Governor’s Council on Disability, a state council that promotes inclusion for Missourians with disabilities. Honan said he wants to use that experience to strengthen MERIL’s role as an advocate for disability rights.

“It is important for MERIL to be involved in discussions about public policy issues that affect people with disabilities,” Honan said. “As an organization, MERIL encourages lawmakers to support legislation that benefits people with disabilities, and we encourage people with disabilities to learn about the issues that affect them and to advocate for themselves.”

Honan has been involved with the disability community throughout his life, and he has been a participant, a board member, and an executive director at centers for independent living. Centers for independent living, such as MERIL, assist people with disabilities so they can live safely in their homes and participate in their communities.

“The independent living philosophy includes the idea that people with disabilities should have control over their own lives,” Honan said. “This is what MERIL helps people do, and I’m looking forward to continuing that service with the disability community here in Northwest Missouri.”

MERIL offers a variety of services for people with disabilities and those who are aging, including assistance with personal care attendants, in-home nursing, home health, assistive technology, sign-language interpreting, youth transition, information and referral services, and community education and advocacy.

More information about MERIL and its resources is available on www.meril.org and at 816-279-8558.

 

 

Funding for DeafBlind Support Services

Governor Nixon Signs HB 1696 for DeafBlind Support Services

Jefferson City, MO (June 14, 2016) – This afternoon, Missouri Governor Jeremiah (Jay) Nixon signed House Bill 1696, known as the SSP Bill. The passage of this law will initiate training and compensation for support service providers (SSPs) for individuals who are DeafBlind. The bill was Truly Agreed To and Finally Passed on May 12.

Now that HB 1696 has been signed, this law will allow the Missouri Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH) to receive funding via appropriations in order to create new programs to train and provide support services to DeafBlind individuals. The nature of the support services an SSP may provide varies widely based on the individual’s needs. Common tasks that require an SSP may include traveling to and from work, navigating a grocery store, describing signage, or relaying information from written documents.

The structure and scope of this program will depend on how much funding MCDHH receives annually via appropriations. MCDHH also intends to apply for additional grants.

Missouri does not currently have a formal, statewide system for training or certifying SSPs. Many DeafBlind individuals typically rely on family members and friends to take care of these needs, which is often a barrier to their independence.

MCDHH Executive Director Opeoluwa Sotonwa thanked Governor Nixon for signing the bill.

“Incorporating support services into the work of the Commission is truly a huge step,” Sotonwa said. “Not only does this day mark a major opportunity for DeafBlind Missourians, but an opportunity for the rest of us to access the fresh perspectives of people we may not otherwise have the chance to experience.”

The term DeafBlind is used to identify a person who has any combination of hearing loss and vision loss; an individual does not have to be completely Deaf and completely blind to identify as DeafBlind.

About MCDHH:

MCDHH works with individuals, service providers, businesses, organizations, and state agencies to improve the lives and opportunities of all Missourians with hearing loss. It functions as an agency of the state to advocate for public policies, regulations, and programs to improve the quality and coordination of existing services for individuals with hearing loss, and to promote new services whenever necessary. More information about MCDHH and the services it offers is available at http://mcdhh.mo.gov.

Starkloff Disability Institute Seeks Advocates to Help Eliminate Work Disincentives

The Starkloff Disability Institute is creating a grassroots advocacy group and are looking for motivated people with disabilities who want to work without the risk of losing vital health care coverage (including home and community based services).

If you are interested in sharing your story, email Steve Foelsch (sfoelsch@starkloff.org) or Brigid McGuire (bmcguire@starkloff.org), or call them at 314.588.7090.

Savannah Middle School Students Explore “Attitudes” Toward People With Disabilities

Students in Susan Whitman’s 8th grade class at Savannah Middle School wrote essays exploring “Attitudes” toward people with disabilities. Their submissions included insight into what they’ve observed and experienced. The top three essays are available below for your reading pleasure!

1st Place – “Rise Above” by James Alberty
2nd Place – “Jayden” by Baylee Hoffman
3rd Place – “Challenge Isn’t Always a Bad Thing” by Zoey Vega

New Restaurant Technology Aids People With Disabilities

Posted: Monday, March 23, 2015 6:00 am
By Jena Sauber St. Joseph News-Press

Previously, going through any restaurant drive-thru was a multi-step process for St. Joseph resident De Linda Kelly.
“For myself, I am deaf, so when I went through the drive-thru at any restaurant, I always have to stop at the intercom and wait a few seconds,” Ms. Kelly said. “And then I have to drive forward to the window with a piece of paper and a pen and write back and forth what I want.”
Now, one restaurant in St. Joseph has made that process easier.
In an attempt to streamline the drive-thru process for both customers and employees, the Subway franchise at 4514 S.E. Highway 169 recently replaced its drive-thru speaker with a touch-screen system.
The new system can be particularly helpful for people with disabilities, said Ms. Kelly, director of communications and transition services at MERIL.
“It’s not just that it helps with deaf or hard of hearing people, but also with people who have speech difficulties, for example, someone that might have cleft pallet or throat cancer,” she said.
The reception has been mostly positive so far, said Alyson Thompson, senior regional manager with Subway.
“Many customers really like it,” she said. “Some of the regulars were a little bit hesitant to how it works because it could be a little overwhelming from a technology standpoint, but most people really like it.”
After she knew how to use it, the ordering process took her less than a minute, Ms. Kelly said. The system allows customers to choose from regular sandwich options or create their own sandwich, as well as add chips, drinks or cookies.
Users also can pay for their purchase at the machine. The system can record a customer’s previous purchases and offer prompts, which can expedite the process.
If the new technology is successful, a
touch-screen system may be installed at an additional drive-thru location in town, Ms. Thompson said. Currently, three Subway locations in St. Joseph have a drive-thru, including one double lane with a design that would be unable to incorporate touch screens, Ms. Thompson said.
“It was really cool,” Ms. Kelly said of the new technology. “The services that Subway is providing, I don’t think they realize how much more accessible that touch screen is for people with disabilities.”

Ribbon Cutting Celebrates New Computer Lab

 

MERIL is pleased to announce the opening of our new computer lab.  Through the generous donation of ABTU, four computers are now available for use by anyone who needs access to the internet!

MERIL would like to extend a big “THANK YOU” to ABTU for their thoughtful gift, and for partnering with MERIL to help remove barriers!

 

 

Read the full press release by clicking ABTU Lab Donation to MERIL – Press Release.